• Book Club

    W E L C O M E  T O  T H E  C L U B



    This club is sort of a double blind experiment - you know, where the researcher and the participant both have no idea what's going on (haha, that's a poor explanation. You get the idea.). Every month we'll read a new book from my list that I've never before read, but that should meet the following criteria:

    1. It's gotten great reviews.
    2. It's uplifting and empowering.
    3. It's written to preserve something beautiful (picturesque landscape, art, etc.).

    To be a member of the club, simply hop over to the monthly virtual event (usually hosted the 3rd Wednesday night of the month at 8:30pm EST) hosted at The Daily Unwind Facebook Page where we'll discuss what we thought of the book and engage in some thought provoking questions. Let's have fun discovering new books together!

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    A U G U S T  2 0 1 8  S E L E C T I O N

    Book Club Meeting: Wednesday, August 15, 2018 @ 8:30pm EST
    Selection Title: Major Pettigrew's Last Stand by Helen Simonson


    In the small village of Edgecombe St. Mary in the English countryside lives Major Ernest Pettigrew (retired), the unlikely hero of Helen Simonson’s wondrous debut. Wry, courtly, opinionated, and completely endearing, the Major leads a quiet life valuing the proper things that Englishmen have lived by for generations: honor, duty, decorum, and a properly brewed cup of tea. But then his brother’s death sparks an unexpected friendship with Mrs. Jasmina Ali, the Pakistani shopkeeper from the village. Drawn together by their shared love of literature and the loss of their spouses, the Major and Mrs. Ali soon find their friendship blossoming into something more. But village society insists on embracing him as the quintessential local and regarding her as the permanent foreigner. Can their relationship survive the risks one takes when pursuing happiness in the face of culture and tradition?

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    J U LY  2 0 1 8  S E L E C T I O N

    Book Club Meeting: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 @ 8:30pm EST
    Selection Title: Lisette's List by Susan Vreeland



    From Susan Vreeland, bestselling author of such acclaimed novels as Girl in Hyacinth Blue, Luncheon of the Boating Party, and Clara and Mr. Tiffany, comes a richly imagined story of a woman’s awakening in the south of Vichy France—to the power of art, to the beauty of provincial life, and to love in the midst of war.

    In 1937, young Lisette Roux and her husband, André, move from Paris to a village in Provence to care for André’s grandfather Pascal. Lisette regrets having to give up her dream of becoming a gallery apprentice and longs for the comforts and sophistication of Paris. But as she soon discovers, the hilltop town is rich with unexpected pleasures.

    Pascal once worked in the nearby ochre mines and later became a pigment salesman and frame maker; while selling his pigments in Paris, he befriended Pissarro and Cézanne, some of whose paintings he received in trade for his frames. Pascal begins to tutor Lisette in both art and life, allowing her to see his small collection of paintings and the Provençal landscape itself in a new light. Inspired by Pascal’s advice to “Do the important things first,” Lisette begins a list of vows to herself (#4. Learn what makes a painting great). When war breaks out, André goes off to the front, but not before hiding Pascal’s paintings to keep them from the Nazis’ reach.

    With German forces spreading across Europe, the sudden fall of Paris, and the rise of Vichy France, Lisette sets out to locate the paintings (#11. Find the paintings in my lifetime). Her search takes her through the stunning French countryside, where she befriends Marc and Bella Chagall, who are in hiding before their flight to America, and acquaints her with the land, her neighbors, and even herself in ways she never dreamed possible. Through joy and tragedy, occupation and liberation, small acts of kindness and great acts of courage, Lisette learns to forgive the past, to live robustly, and to love again.
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